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Spoiler
i will seriously consider to migrate. i won't sit my ass in a small island with a nuke reactor. where the fuck we run if anything happens?

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/sin...1034599/1/.html
Marney1
They're lying, it's not for energy purposes they want to build a bomb to nuke Israel. But seriously somewhere like Singapore could probably do with it and as regards to where you can run if it goes all Chernobyl on you just get yourself a charcoal lined suit and hope for the best.
Spoiler
nope, not Isreal definitely. may be a Muslim neighbor, we are US pet dog. mad.gif

i think lots of people will oppose it (here is 1) and government will just do what they want. the last time they listen to the public is when they are cheering for national day parade. wink.gif
Marney1
QUOTE (SPOILER @ Feb 4 2010, 12:56 PM) *
nope, not Isreal definitely. may be a Muslim neighbor, we are US pet dog. mad.gif

i think lots of people will oppose it (here is 1) and government will just do what they want. the last time they listen to the public is when they are cheering for national day parade. wink.gif

We're not allowed a national day parade, we can't even fly a flag in case it offends Pakis.
Ex-PS Fanboy
I live in between two nuclear power plants... (One to the north, and one two towns over) It's really not that big a deal. In fact my grandmother worked there until she was 60. If she can handle that I'm sure you can.
TreeFitty
Aside from the possibility of a meltdown, it's not that bad of a thing. Advancements have been made over the years to make them safer and prevent such disasters. Only downside in the long run is the waste.
Ex-PS Fanboy
QUOTE (TreeFitty @ Feb 4 2010, 11:35 AM) *
Aside from the possibility of a meltdown, it's not that bad of a thing. Advancements have been made over the years to make them safer and prevent such disasters. Only downside in the long run is the waste.

...And if your country goes to war your the most likely location to be nuked.
TreeFitty
moar like do the nukING.
Skinny 
How many meltdowns do you guys think there has actually been?
Ex-PS Fanboy
QUOTE (TreeFitty @ Feb 4 2010, 11:50 AM) *
moar like do the nukING.

Actually I was discussing this with someone a while back and apparently if we get nuked the idea city would be mine because it's directly in between two nuclear plants.

QUOTE (Lelouch vi Britannia @ Feb 4 2010, 02:13 PM) *
How many meltdowns do you guys think there has actually been?

Chernobyl. That's about it.
TreeFitty
Been plenty of accidents over the years. Chernobyl was the worst. 3 Mile Island is the closest one to home that had an accident but it was well contained.
Skinny 
I didn't say accidents, I said meltdowns.
TreeFitty
Chernobyl: meltdown+explosion
3 Mile Island: meltdown that was contained

Unless it was caused on purpose it's an accident.
Skinny 
Duh, but there are varrieties of accidents, but they haven't all been meltdowns that weren't contained.
Spoiler
well,melt down or not.point is people can't stay there afterwards.what about water contaminaion?we have limited source of water.

show me ur hands PS, how many fingers do u have?
TreeFitty
Contaminated water from what? The water used to cool the reactors has very little (if at all) radiation.
Spoiler
QUOTE (TreeFitty @ Feb 5 2010, 02:39 AM) *
Contaminated water from what? The water used to cool the reactors has very little (if at all) radiation.

well, i don't know it for a fact. but i heard that the water can't be used for years if it's being contaminated by nuke accident.
TreeFitty
After a [bad] accident the whole area will be contaminated and not useful. But as said, there are safety measures to prevent them, or contain the problem at the plant should something small happen.
Spoiler
how big could this Area be?
TreeFitty
Depend how big it go BOOM. Chernobyl was very bad. But that was the Soviets being cheap and shit REALLY hit the fan.
0bs3n3
QUOTE (Marney1 @ Feb 5 2010, 12:15 AM) *
QUOTE (SPOILER @ Feb 4 2010, 12:56 PM) *
nope, not Isreal definitely. may be a Muslim neighbor, we are US pet dog. mad.gif

i think lots of people will oppose it (here is 1) and government will just do what they want. the last time they listen to the public is when they are cheering for national day parade. wink.gif

We're not allowed a national day parade, we can't even fly a flag in case it offends Pakis.


I lol how the UAF wave Paki flags.
Skinny 
QUOTE (SPOILER @ Feb 5 2010, 03:20 PM) *
QUOTE (TreeFitty @ Feb 5 2010, 02:39 AM) *
Contaminated water from what? The water used to cool the reactors has very little (if at all) radiation.

well, i don't know it for a fact. but i heard that the water can't be used for years if it's being contaminated by nuke accident.

People see nuclear reactors as a place that has radiation seeping out of it; it's not.
Heartless
QUOTE (Lelouch vi Britannia @ Feb 5 2010, 02:08 AM) *
QUOTE (SPOILER @ Feb 5 2010, 03:20 PM) *
QUOTE (TreeFitty @ Feb 5 2010, 02:39 AM) *
Contaminated water from what? The water used to cool the reactors has very little (if at all) radiation.

well, i don't know it for a fact. but i heard that the water can't be used for years if it's being contaminated by nuke accident.

People see nuclear reactors as a place that has radiation seeping out of it; it's not.


Not true. Even the US has had several high level leaks in its past.
TreeFitty
It's still not like it used to be. More efficient, more contained.
Heartless
QUOTE (TreeFitty @ Feb 5 2010, 02:27 AM) *
It's still not like it used to be. More efficient, more contained.


Really?

April 10, 2003 — INES Level 3 - Paks, Hungary - Fuel damaged
Partially spent fuel rods undergoing cleaning in a tank of heavy water ruptured and spilled fuel pellets at Paks Nuclear Power Plant. It is suspected that inadequate cooling of the rods during the cleaning process combined with a sudden influx of cold water thermally shocked fuel rods causing them to split. Boric acid was added to the tank to prevent the loose fuel pellets from achieving criticality. Ammonia and hydrazine were also added to absorb iodine-131.
April 19, 2005 — INES Level 3 - Sellafield, England, United Kingdom - Nuclear material leak
Twenty metric tons of uranium and 160 kilograms of plutonium dissolved in 83,000 litres of nitric acid leaked over several months from a cracked pipe into a stainless steel sump chamber at the Thorp nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The partially processed spent fuel was drained into holding tanks outside the plant. [33] [34] .
November 2005 — INES Level needed - Braidwood, Illinois, United States - Nuclear material leak
Tritium contamination of groundwater was discovered at Exelon's Braidwood station. Groundwater off site remains within safe drinking standards though the NRC is requiring the plant to correct any problems related to the release. [35]
March 6, 2006 — INES Level needed - Erwin, Tennessee, United States - Nuclear material leak
Thirty-five liters of a highly enriched uranium solution leaked during transfer into a lab at Nuclear Fuel Services Erwin Plant. The incident caused a seven-month shutdown. A required public hearing on the licensing of the plant was not held due to the absence of public notification.[36] [37] [38] [39]



February 1, 2000 – The radiation source of a teletherapy unit was stolen from a parking lot in Samut Prakarn, Thailand and dismantled in a junkyard for scrap metal. Workers completely removed the 60Co source from the lead shielding, and became ill shortly thereafter. The radioactive nature of the metal and the resulting contamination was not discovered until 18 days later. Seven injuries and three deaths were a result of this incident.[26]
December 2000 – Three woodcutters in the nation of Georgia spent the night beside several "warm" canisters they found deep in the woods and were subsequently hospitalized with severe radiation burns. The canisters were found to contain concentrated 90Sr. The disposal team consisted of 25 men who were restricted to 40 seconds' worth of exposure each while transferring the canisters to lead-lined drums. The canisters are believed to have been components of radioisotope thermoelectric generators intended for use as generators for remote lighthouses and navigational beacons, part of a Soviet plan dating back to 1983.[27]
February 2001 – A medical accelerator at the Bialystok Oncology Center in Poland malfunctioned, resulting in five female patients receiving excessive doses of radiation while undergoing breast cancer treatment.[2] The incident was revealed when one of the patients complained of a painful radiation burn. In response, a local technician was called in to repair the device, but was unable to do so, and in fact caused further damage. Subsequently, competent authorities were notified, but as the apparatus had been tampered with, they were unable to ascertain the exact doses of radiation received by the patients (localized doses may have been in excess of 60 Gy). No deaths were reported as a result of this incident, although all affected patients had to receive skin grafts. The attending doctor was charged with criminal negligence, but in 2003 a district court ruled that she was not responsible for the incident. The hospital technician was fined.[3]
March 11, 2002 – A 2.5 metric tonne 60Co gamma source was transported from Cookridge Hospital, Leeds, UK, to Sellafield with defective shielding. As the radiation escaped from the package downwards into the ground, it is not thought that this event caused any injury or disease in either a human or an animal. This event was treated in a serious manner because the defense in depth type of protection for the source had been eroded. If the container had been tipped over in a road crash then a strong beam of gamma rays would have been directed in a direction where it would be likely to irradiate humans. The company responsible for the transport of the source, AEA Technology plc, was fined £250,000 by a British court.
2003 – Cape of Navarin, Chukotka Autonomous Okrug, Russia. A radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) located on the Arctic shore was discovered in a highly degraded state. The level of the exposition dose at the generator surface was as high as 15 R/h; in July 2004 a second inspection of the same RTG showed that gamma radiation emission had risen to 87 R/h and that 90Sr had begun to leak into the environment. [4] In November 2003, a completely dismantled RTG located on the Island of Yuzhny Goryachinsky in the Kola Bay was found. The generator's radioactive heat source was found on the ground near the shoreline in the northern part of the island. [5]
September 10, 2004 – Yakutia, Russia. Two radioisotope thermoelectric generators were dropped 50 meters onto the tundra at Zemlya Bunge island during an airlift when the helicopter flew into heavy weather. According to the nuclear regulators, the impact compromised the RTGs' external radiation shielding. At a height of 10 meters above the impact site, the intensity of gamma radiation was measured at 4 mSv/hr. [6]
2005 – Dounreay, UK. In September, the site's cementation plant was closed when 266 liters of radioactive reprocessing residues were spilled inside containment. [7][8]. In October, another of the site's reprocessing laboratories was closed down after nose-blow tests of eight workers tested positive for trace radioactivity. [9]
November 3, 2005 – Haddam, Connecticut, USA. The Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company reported that water containing quantities (below safe drinking water limits) of 137Cs, 60Co, 90Sr, and 3H leaked from a spent fuel pond. Independent measurements and review of the incident by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission are due to begin November 7, 2005. [10][11][12]
March 11, 2006 – at Fleurus, Belgium, an operator working for the company Sterigenics[13], at a medical equipment sterilization site, entered the irradiation room and remained there for 20 seconds. The room contained a source of 60Co which was not in the pool of water.[14] Three weeks later, the worker suffered of symptoms typical of an irradiation (vomit, loss of hair, fatigue). One estimate that he was exposed to a dose of between 4.4 and 4.8 Gy due to a malfunction of the control-command hydraulic system maintaining the radioactive source in the pool. The operator spent over one month in a specialized hospital before going back home. Today he still shows after-effects (fatigue) that should attenuate in several months. To protect workers, the federal nuclear control agency AFCN and private auditors from AVN recommended Sterigenics to install a redundant system of security. It is an accident of level 4 on the INES scale.[15][16][17]
May 5, 2006 – An accidental release of 131I gas at the Prairie Island Nuclear Power Plant in Minnesota exposed approximately one hundred plant workers to low-level radiation. Most workers received 10 to 20 millirads (0.1-0.2 mSv), about the same as a dental X-ray. The workers were wearing protective gear at the time, and no radiation leaked outside the plant to the surrounding area. [18]
Lisa Norris died in 2006 after having been given an overdose of radiation as a result of human error during treatment for a brain tumor at Beatson Oncology Centre in Glasgow (Scotland).[19][20][21]. The Scottish Government have published an independent investigation of this case.[22]. The intended treatment for Lisa Norris was 35 Gy to be delivered by a LINAC machine to the whole of the central nervous system to be delivered in twenty equal fractions of 1.75 Gy, which was to be followed by 19.8 Gy to be delivered to the tumor only (in eleven fractions of 1.8 Gy). In the first phase of the treatment a 58% overdose occurred, and the CNS of Lisa Norris suffered a dose of 55.5 Gy. The second phase of the treatment was abandoned on medical advice, after having lived for some time after the overdose Lisa Norris passed away.
August 23–24, 2008 — INES Level 3 - Fleurus, Belgium - Nuclear material leak
A gaseous leak of a radioisotope of iodine, 131I, was detected at a large medical radioisotope laboratory, Institut national des Radio-Eléments. Belgian authorities implemented restrictions on use of local farming produce within 5 km of the leak, when higher-than-expected levels of contamination was detected in local grass. The particular isotope of iodine has a half life of 8 days[23] [24]. The European Commission sent out a warning over their ECURIE-alert system on the 29th of August[28]. The quantity of radioactivity released into the environment was estimated at 45 GBq I-131, which corresponds to a dose of 160 microsievert (effective dose) for a hypothetical person remaining permanently at the site's enclosure[29].
January 23, 2008 A radiologic technologist at Mad River Community Hospital in Arcata, California allegedly performed 151 CT scans on a 23 month old child over a 65 minute period. The child suffered radiation burns to much of his head. The hospital's nuclear health physicist estimated that the child received a localized dose possibly as high as 11Gy. An independent investigation of the child's blood found that he had severe chromosome abnormalities because of the exposure. The technologist was fired, and her license was suspended by the state of California. An investigation is ongoing.[30]
February 2008-August 2009 - A software misconfiguration in a CT scanner used for brain perfusion scanning at Cedar Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, resulted in 206 patients receiving radiation doses approximately 8 times higher than intended during an 18 month period starting in February, 2008. Some patients reported temporary hair loss and erythema. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has estimated that patients received doses between 3Gy and 4Gy.[31]
0bs3n3
Why the hell isn't Australia using them? I mean serious, we can just put them far out west and it can't hurt anyone, plus up north we have some of the richest Uranium deposits in the world. + space to store waste, and no greenies, just because we'd store them in the desert doens't mean they'd be in Uluru.
TreeFitty
QUOTE (Geert Wilders @ Feb 5 2010, 02:36 AM) *
QUOTE (TreeFitty @ Feb 5 2010, 02:27 AM) *
It's still not like it used to be. More efficient, more contained.


Really?

April 10, 2003 — INES Level 3 - Paks, Hungary - Fuel damaged at plant. -Doesn't talk about injuries.
November 2005 — INES Level needed - Braidwood, Illinois, United States - Nuclear material leak at plant. -Offsite groundwater is fine. I'll give it to you.
March 6, 2006 — INES Level needed - Erwin, Tennessee, United States - Nuclear material leak at plant. -Doesn't talk about injuries.
2005 – Dounreay, UK. In September, the site's cementation plant was closed when 266 liters of radioactive reprocessing residues were spilled inside containment. In October, another of the site's reprocessing laboratories was closed down after nose-blow tests of eight workers tested positive for trace radioactivity. -There we go.
November 3, 2005 – Haddam, Connecticut, USA. The Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company reported that water containing quantities (below safe drinking water limits) of 137Cs, 60Co, 90Sr, and 3H leaked from a spent fuel pond. -Okay. Doesn't talk about injuries.
May 5, 2006 – An accidental release of 131I gas at the Prairie Island Nuclear Power Plant in Minnesota exposed approximately one hundred plant workers to low-level radiation. -Good.


Cut non-nuclear power plant items and those not related to regular containment of materials in the plant. Down to about 6 with issues. Other things you posted that happened at the plants were during transport of rods/material. More human error than the construction of the structure.

Small note: the only stated injuries in the above were plant workers.
Spoiler
^ahh we are fucked!
TreeFitty
QUOTE (SPOILER @ Feb 5 2010, 03:13 AM) *
^ahh we are fucked!


Just don't get a job there. You'll be fine outside. tongue.gif
Spoiler
:tongue.gif: planning to stay as far away as possible.
Darth Sexy
QUOTE (0bs3n3 @ Feb 5 2010, 06:05 PM) *
Why the hell isn't Australia using them? I mean serious, we can just put them far out west and it can't hurt anyone, plus up north we have some of the richest Uranium deposits in the world. + space to store waste, and no greenies, just because we'd store them in the desert doens't mean they'd be in Uluru.

Because the green movement won't allow it. Ignore that it is far cleaner and more efficient than burning coal.

SPOILER, there have been two meltdowns that I am aware of. Chernobyl was mainly down to human error and poor (typically communist) maintenance, and 3 Mile Island was contained. That's 2 incidents in the however many years the however many plants have been operating around the world. Australia had a gas plant explode about 10 years ago. That doesn't mean gas plants are unsafe and will kill everyone.

Edit: Don't assume The Simpsons is an accurate representation of how a nuclear plant is run.
Heartless
Fun Fact:

The most likely US terror attack is a pipeline of crude oil that runs through most of Upstate NY. Why would anyone target such a shithole? Because those lines crisscross through every nuclear reactor on the great lakes in NY state. Which number so many that a catastrophic explosion could trigger such a meltdown to not only leave the state highly irradiated, but everything connected via the waterway. Don't believe me? Google search terrorist cells in Buffalo.
Ex-PS Fanboy
QUOTE (SPOILER @ Feb 4 2010, 08:36 PM) *
show me ur hands PS, how many fingers do u have?

11.
TreeFitty
lol@Heartless
Heartless
QUOTE (TreeFitty @ Feb 5 2010, 01:58 PM) *
lol@Heartless


You know what I'm on about!
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