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CJ 4 life
I know CJ & company pronounce the TH sound in words like "brother", "motherfucker" in a different way; it's like a D, but not a normal D, you gotta put your tongue against the back of your upper teeth. But how about the words that have this sound at the beginning? For example "this", "the" and so on. Sometimes I've heard CJ pronounces a normal D, like in this video, when CJ says to Cesar on the phone:"Where we going with Dis". This is just a normal D, like in "Day", with the D pronounced with a little "burst". But in most other times CJ doesn't produce the "burst", so the TH becomes the one as in medial position (see above). So how is it pronounced when it occurs at the beginning of a word? With the little "burst" (just like a normal D) or without it (the tongue is place differently)?
Mad Space Ghost
Its called ghetto ebonics talk.

Its like talking with shit in your mouth thats why its like that.
CJ 4 life
QUOTE(Francis McReary @ Feb 9 2008, 06:11 AM) [snapback]1392804[/snapback]
Its called ghetto ebonics talk.

Its like talking with shit in your mouth thats why its like that.

You think I didn't know this is Ebonics? glare.gif
Besides, I didn't ask you to give your personal opinoin about that, just tell me how the pronounce TH at the beginning of words, it's driving me crazy!
gingergenius
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 9 2008, 02:43 PM) [snapback]1392869[/snapback]
QUOTE(Francis McReary @ Feb 9 2008, 06:11 AM) [snapback]1392804[/snapback]
Its called ghetto ebonics talk.

Its like talking with shit in your mouth thats why its like that.

You think I didn't know this is Ebonics? glare.gif
Besides, I didn't ask you to give your personal opinoin about that, just tell me how the pronounce TH at the beginning of words, it's driving me crazy!


The English language used not to have a 'th' written in script. The letters 'eth' and 'thorn' represented it. These letters are still used in Icelandic and i think other nordic languages like faroese.

ETH - (, )

Represents 'th' in mother, brother, this, these, the, etc. etc.

THORN - (, )

Represents 'th' in thing, thought, through, thick, pith etc.

Those are the basic sounds of 'th' in ordinary English.

Some accents and dialects obviously pronounce things differently.

In ones with a large influence of black people (particularly Caribbean & Ebonics), '' sounds at the beginning of words tend to become 'd' sounds. The '' sound is pronounced as normal.
CJ 4 life
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 9 2008, 05:02 PM) [snapback]1392877[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 9 2008, 02:43 PM) [snapback]1392869[/snapback]
QUOTE(Francis McReary @ Feb 9 2008, 06:11 AM) [snapback]1392804[/snapback]
Its called ghetto ebonics talk.

Its like talking with shit in your mouth thats why its like that.

You think I didn't know this is Ebonics? glare.gif
Besides, I didn't ask you to give your personal opinoin about that, just tell me how the pronounce TH at the beginning of words, it's driving me crazy!


The English language used not to have a 'th' written in script. The letters 'eth' and 'thorn' represented it. These letters are still used in Icelandic and i think other nordic languages like faroese.

ETH - (, )

Represents 'th' in mother, brother, this, these, the, etc. etc.

THORN - (, )

Represents 'th' in thing, thought, through, thick, pith etc.

Those are the basic sounds of 'th' in ordinary English.

Some accents and dialects obviously pronounce things differently.

In ones with a large influence of black people (particularly Caribbean & Ebonics), '' sounds at the beginning of words tend to become 'd' sounds. The '' sound is pronounced as normal.

Thank you a bunch for answering me. Like you said, this sound becomes D at the beginning of words, but in this other video when CJ says:"What the..." it's not a normal D, cuz it lacks the typical "burst" of the normal D sound, tou know what I mean? So the tongue must be placed differently, like I said before. Please help me out!!!! blush.gif
gingergenius
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 9 2008, 04:23 PM) [snapback]1392879[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 9 2008, 05:02 PM) [snapback]1392877[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 9 2008, 02:43 PM) [snapback]1392869[/snapback]
QUOTE(Francis McReary @ Feb 9 2008, 06:11 AM) [snapback]1392804[/snapback]
Its called ghetto ebonics talk.

Its like talking with shit in your mouth thats why its like that.

You think I didn't know this is Ebonics? glare.gif
Besides, I didn't ask you to give your personal opinoin about that, just tell me how the pronounce TH at the beginning of words, it's driving me crazy!


The English language used not to have a 'th' written in script. The letters 'eth' and 'thorn' represented it. These letters are still used in Icelandic and i think other nordic languages like faroese.

ETH - (, )

Represents 'th' in mother, brother, this, these, the, etc. etc.

THORN - (, )

Represents 'th' in thing, thought, through, thick, pith etc.

Those are the basic sounds of 'th' in ordinary English.

Some accents and dialects obviously pronounce things differently.

In ones with a large influence of black people (particularly Caribbean & Ebonics), '' sounds at the beginning of words tend to become 'd' sounds. The '' sound is pronounced as normal.

Thank you a bunch for answering me. Like you said, this sound becomes D at the beginning of words, but in this other video when CJ says:"What the..." it's not a normal D, cuz it lacks the typical "burst" of the normal D sound, tou know what I mean? So the tongue must be placed differently, like I said before. Please help me out!!!! blush.gif


listen to the sound and mimic it with your tongue. it's not hard.
CJ 4 life
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 9 2008, 07:20 PM) [snapback]1392895[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 9 2008, 04:23 PM) [snapback]1392879[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 9 2008, 05:02 PM) [snapback]1392877[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 9 2008, 02:43 PM) [snapback]1392869[/snapback]
QUOTE(Francis McReary @ Feb 9 2008, 06:11 AM) [snapback]1392804[/snapback]
Its called ghetto ebonics talk.

Its like talking with shit in your mouth thats why its like that.

You think I didn't know this is Ebonics? glare.gif
Besides, I didn't ask you to give your personal opinoin about that, just tell me how the pronounce TH at the beginning of words, it's driving me crazy!


The English language used not to have a 'th' written in script. The letters 'eth' and 'thorn' represented it. These letters are still used in Icelandic and i think other nordic languages like faroese.

ETH - (, )

Represents 'th' in mother, brother, this, these, the, etc. etc.

THORN - (, )

Represents 'th' in thing, thought, through, thick, pith etc.

Those are the basic sounds of 'th' in ordinary English.

Some accents and dialects obviously pronounce things differently.

In ones with a large influence of black people (particularly Caribbean & Ebonics), '' sounds at the beginning of words tend to become 'd' sounds. The '' sound is pronounced as normal.

Thank you a bunch for answering me. Like you said, this sound becomes D at the beginning of words, but in this other video when CJ says:"What the..." it's not a normal D, cuz it lacks the typical "burst" of the normal D sound, tou know what I mean? So the tongue must be placed differently, like I said before. Please help me out!!!! blush.gif


listen to the sound and mimic it with your tongue. it's not hard.

No no, you ain't understood. I know how to produce this sound, what I wanna know is why CJ & co. sometimes use this sound and sometimes they use a normal D. Why? Shouldn't they use always the same?
gingergenius
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 10 2008, 02:59 PM) [snapback]1393023[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 9 2008, 07:20 PM) [snapback]1392895[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 9 2008, 04:23 PM) [snapback]1392879[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 9 2008, 05:02 PM) [snapback]1392877[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 9 2008, 02:43 PM) [snapback]1392869[/snapback]
QUOTE(Francis McReary @ Feb 9 2008, 06:11 AM) [snapback]1392804[/snapback]
Its called ghetto ebonics talk.

Its like talking with shit in your mouth thats why its like that.

You think I didn't know this is Ebonics? glare.gif
Besides, I didn't ask you to give your personal opinoin about that, just tell me how the pronounce TH at the beginning of words, it's driving me crazy!


The English language used not to have a 'th' written in script. The letters 'eth' and 'thorn' represented it. These letters are still used in Icelandic and i think other nordic languages like faroese.

ETH - (, )

Represents 'th' in mother, brother, this, these, the, etc. etc.

THORN - (, )

Represents 'th' in thing, thought, through, thick, pith etc.

Those are the basic sounds of 'th' in ordinary English.

Some accents and dialects obviously pronounce things differently.

In ones with a large influence of black people (particularly Caribbean & Ebonics), '' sounds at the beginning of words tend to become 'd' sounds. The '' sound is pronounced as normal.

Thank you a bunch for answering me. Like you said, this sound becomes D at the beginning of words, but in this other video when CJ says:"What the..." it's not a normal D, cuz it lacks the typical "burst" of the normal D sound, tou know what I mean? So the tongue must be placed differently, like I said before. Please help me out!!!! blush.gif


listen to the sound and mimic it with your tongue. it's not hard.

No no, you ain't understood. I know how to produce this sound, what I wanna know is why CJ & co. sometimes use this sound and sometimes they use a normal D. Why? Shouldn't they use always the same?


because they feel like it? language isn't a regimented thing, that's why sometimes you say things differently.

cos thats how they flex? chatting ain't a strictness ya kna... on a level mans speak differentways.

see what I mean? Regular English and London English, there's a difference.
CJ 4 life
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 10 2008, 05:37 PM) [snapback]1393036[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 10 2008, 02:59 PM) [snapback]1393023[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 9 2008, 07:20 PM) [snapback]1392895[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 9 2008, 04:23 PM) [snapback]1392879[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 9 2008, 05:02 PM) [snapback]1392877[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 9 2008, 02:43 PM) [snapback]1392869[/snapback]
QUOTE(Francis McReary @ Feb 9 2008, 06:11 AM) [snapback]1392804[/snapback]
Its called ghetto ebonics talk.

Its like talking with shit in your mouth thats why its like that.

You think I didn't know this is Ebonics? glare.gif
Besides, I didn't ask you to give your personal opinoin about that, just tell me how the pronounce TH at the beginning of words, it's driving me crazy!


The English language used not to have a 'th' written in script. The letters 'eth' and 'thorn' represented it. These letters are still used in Icelandic and i think other nordic languages like faroese.

ETH - (, )

Represents 'th' in mother, brother, this, these, the, etc. etc.

THORN - (, )

Represents 'th' in thing, thought, through, thick, pith etc.

Those are the basic sounds of 'th' in ordinary English.

Some accents and dialects obviously pronounce things differently.

In ones with a large influence of black people (particularly Caribbean & Ebonics), '' sounds at the beginning of words tend to become 'd' sounds. The '' sound is pronounced as normal.

Thank you a bunch for answering me. Like you said, this sound becomes D at the beginning of words, but in this other video when CJ says:"What the..." it's not a normal D, cuz it lacks the typical "burst" of the normal D sound, tou know what I mean? So the tongue must be placed differently, like I said before. Please help me out!!!! blush.gif


listen to the sound and mimic it with your tongue. it's not hard.

No no, you ain't understood. I know how to produce this sound, what I wanna know is why CJ & co. sometimes use this sound and sometimes they use a normal D. Why? Shouldn't they use always the same?


because they feel like it? language isn't a regimented thing, that's why sometimes you say things differently.

cos thats how they flex? chatting ain't a strictness ya kna... on a level mans speak differentways.

see what I mean? Regular English and London English, there's a difference.

I think you still don't get it. When a native speaker of any language speaks its own language, (like you in English), they always use the SAME sound for the same letter. You ain't likely to say one day "thing" and the day later "fing". It becomes absolutely spontaneous to produce the same sound.
Gta San Andreas Alex
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gingergenius
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 11 2008, 03:24 PM) [snapback]1393154[/snapback]
I think you still don't get it. When a native speaker of any language speaks its own language, (like you in English), they always use the SAME sound for the same letter. You ain't likely to say one day "thing" and the day later "fing". It becomes absolutely spontaneous to produce the same sound.


No, sometimes I'll say "It's nothing long", other times I'll say 'nuffin'

I'll go "shut up you prat" and pronounce the 't' on both . Or "shu' your maat' waseman".

you don't always use the same sound.
CJ 4 life
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 11 2008, 08:26 PM) [snapback]1393183[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 11 2008, 03:24 PM) [snapback]1393154[/snapback]
I think you still don't get it. When a native speaker of any language speaks its own language, (like you in English), they always use the SAME sound for the same letter. You ain't likely to say one day "thing" and the day later "fing". It becomes absolutely spontaneous to produce the same sound.


No, sometimes I'll say "It's nothing long", other times I'll say 'nuffin'

I'll go "shut up you prat" and pronounce the 't' on both . Or "shu' your maat' waseman".

you don't always use the same sound.

Out of curiosity: have you ever used the "th" sound used by CJ &co.? It's much cooler, use it from now on. thumbup.gif
gingergenius
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 13 2008, 03:44 PM) [snapback]1393544[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 11 2008, 08:26 PM) [snapback]1393183[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 11 2008, 03:24 PM) [snapback]1393154[/snapback]
I think you still don't get it. When a native speaker of any language speaks its own language, (like you in English), they always use the SAME sound for the same letter. You ain't likely to say one day "thing" and the day later "fing". It becomes absolutely spontaneous to produce the same sound.


No, sometimes I'll say "It's nothing long", other times I'll say 'nuffin'

I'll go "shut up you prat" and pronounce the 't' on both . Or "shu' your maat' waseman".

you don't always use the same sound.

Out of curiosity: have you ever used the "th" sound used by CJ &co.? It's much cooler, use it from now on. thumbup.gif


if i'm speaking quickly yes. but that's part of my accent not because it sounds cooler.
TwoFacedTanner
You'd think this person had never heard anyone talk before.
CJ 4 life
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 13 2008, 05:45 PM) [snapback]1393560[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 13 2008, 03:44 PM) [snapback]1393544[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 11 2008, 08:26 PM) [snapback]1393183[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 11 2008, 03:24 PM) [snapback]1393154[/snapback]
I think you still don't get it. When a native speaker of any language speaks its own language, (like you in English), they always use the SAME sound for the same letter. You ain't likely to say one day "thing" and the day later "fing". It becomes absolutely spontaneous to produce the same sound.


No, sometimes I'll say "It's nothing long", other times I'll say 'nuffin'

I'll go "shut up you prat" and pronounce the 't' on both . Or "shu' your maat' waseman".

you don't always use the same sound.

Out of curiosity: have you ever used the "th" sound used by CJ &co.? It's much cooler, use it from now on. thumbup.gif


if i'm speaking quickly yes. but that's part of my accent not because it sounds cooler.

That's tight!!! thumbup.gif But you are from London, don't people from there pronounce it as a "v" (bruvva, bovver,ecc...)? That's also part of the Cockny accent.
Interesting discussion.
gingergenius
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 14 2008, 06:30 PM) [snapback]1393788[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 13 2008, 05:45 PM) [snapback]1393560[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 13 2008, 03:44 PM) [snapback]1393544[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 11 2008, 08:26 PM) [snapback]1393183[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 11 2008, 03:24 PM) [snapback]1393154[/snapback]
I think you still don't get it. When a native speaker of any language speaks its own language, (like you in English), they always use the SAME sound for the same letter. You ain't likely to say one day "thing" and the day later "fing". It becomes absolutely spontaneous to produce the same sound.


No, sometimes I'll say "It's nothing long", other times I'll say 'nuffin'

I'll go "shut up you prat" and pronounce the 't' on both . Or "shu' your maat' waseman".

you don't always use the same sound.

Out of curiosity: have you ever used the "th" sound used by CJ &co.? It's much cooler, use it from now on. thumbup.gif


if i'm speaking quickly yes. but that's part of my accent not because it sounds cooler.

That's tight!!! thumbup.gif But you are from London, don't people from there pronounce it as a "v" (bruvva, bovver,ecc...)? That's also part of the Cockny accent.
Interesting discussion.


ok if you want to get onto the discussion of accents, then London is the most interesting place in the world right now.

The traditional accent of London is cockney. Rhyming slang's a part of that but mainly its the accent. Don't listen to the pathetic attempts in Green Street, Ocean's 11, Mary Poppins etc. Cockney accent. It's mainly spoken by white people.

Then there's Recieved Pronunciation. That's English without an accent. Everything is pronounced as it should be in the dictionary. That's what we get on the news and stuff like that.

But in London, there's a new dialect, called Multicultural London English. Eg. here
CJ 4 life
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 14 2008, 08:45 PM) [snapback]1393799[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 14 2008, 06:30 PM) [snapback]1393788[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 13 2008, 05:45 PM) [snapback]1393560[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 13 2008, 03:44 PM) [snapback]1393544[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 11 2008, 08:26 PM) [snapback]1393183[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 11 2008, 03:24 PM) [snapback]1393154[/snapback]
I think you still don't get it. When a native speaker of any language speaks its own language, (like you in English), they always use the SAME sound for the same letter. You ain't likely to say one day "thing" and the day later "fing". It becomes absolutely spontaneous to produce the same sound.


No, sometimes I'll say "It's nothing long", other times I'll say 'nuffin'

I'll go "shut up you prat" and pronounce the 't' on both . Or "shu' your maat' waseman".

you don't always use the same sound.

Out of curiosity: have you ever used the "th" sound used by CJ &co.? It's much cooler, use it from now on. thumbup.gif


if i'm speaking quickly yes. but that's part of my accent not because it sounds cooler.

That's tight!!! thumbup.gif But you are from London, don't people from there pronounce it as a "v" (bruvva, bovver,ecc...)? That's also part of the Cockny accent.
Interesting discussion.


ok if you want to get onto the discussion of accents, then London is the most interesting place in the world right now.

The traditional accent of London is cockney. Rhyming slang's a part of that but mainly its the accent. Don't listen to the pathetic attempts in Green Street, Ocean's 11, Mary Poppins etc. Cockney accent. It's mainly spoken by white people.

Then there's Recieved Pronunciation. That's English without an accent. Everything is pronounced as it should be in the dictionary. That's what we get on the news and stuff like that.

But in London, there's a new dialect, called Multicultural London English. Eg. here

Wow, sounds a little like American. You speak that?
TwoFacedTanner
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 14 2008, 01:45 PM) [snapback]1393799[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 14 2008, 06:30 PM) [snapback]1393788[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 13 2008, 05:45 PM) [snapback]1393560[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 13 2008, 03:44 PM) [snapback]1393544[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 11 2008, 08:26 PM) [snapback]1393183[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 11 2008, 03:24 PM) [snapback]1393154[/snapback]
I think you still don't get it. When a native speaker of any language speaks its own language, (like you in English), they always use the SAME sound for the same letter. You ain't likely to say one day "thing" and the day later "fing". It becomes absolutely spontaneous to produce the same sound.


No, sometimes I'll say "It's nothing long", other times I'll say 'nuffin'

I'll go "shut up you prat" and pronounce the 't' on both . Or "shu' your maat' waseman".

you don't always use the same sound.

Out of curiosity: have you ever used the "th" sound used by CJ &co.? It's much cooler, use it from now on. thumbup.gif


if i'm speaking quickly yes. but that's part of my accent not because it sounds cooler.

That's tight!!! thumbup.gif But you are from London, don't people from there pronounce it as a "v" (bruvva, bovver,ecc...)? That's also part of the Cockny accent.
Interesting discussion.


ok if you want to get onto the discussion of accents, then London is the most interesting place in the world right now.

The traditional accent of London is cockney. Rhyming slang's a part of that but mainly its the accent. Don't listen to the pathetic attempts in Green Street, Ocean's 11, Mary Poppins etc. Cockney accent. It's mainly spoken by white people.

Then there's Recieved Pronunciation. That's English without an accent. Everything is pronounced as it should be in the dictionary. That's what we get on the news and stuff like that.

But in London, there's a new dialect, called Multicultural London English. Eg. here


I wish it'd stay like that.
I always loved the way they talk there.

And I also loved The Football Factory. That was a great movie.
gingergenius
QUOTE(TwoFacedTanner @ Feb 15 2008, 04:19 PM) [snapback]1393904[/snapback]
I wish it'd stay like that.
I always loved the way they talk there.

And I also loved The Football Factory. That was a great movie.


It's kind of weird. Cockney is very much a white, working class accent. In London, the middle classes tend to speak Recieved Pronunciation, except with a lot of people this accent takes on stuff from cockney, especially dropping 't's at the end of a word.

Now young people have this new accent, Jafaican, or MLE. As an accent it's across between Jamaican, Cockney, RP, West African, and South Asian. If you're from a Caribbean background then the Jamaican part comes through more strongly. If you're middle class then the RP comes through more strongly. And so on. It's relatively new so it's only really spoken by under 25s.

The slang is all important as well, and the slang words come from a variety of different sources.

Da most truwist form ov da aksent is laayk dis ya kna, mans cha' wiv fick slang an' ting.

My personal aksunt iz like dis, I speek wiv less ov a thick aksunt coz I'm wi' an' middul claass.

maybe its difficult for you to see the difference.
CJ 4 life
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 15 2008, 05:51 PM) [snapback]1393912[/snapback]
QUOTE(TwoFacedTanner @ Feb 15 2008, 04:19 PM) [snapback]1393904[/snapback]
I wish it'd stay like that.
I always loved the way they talk there.

And I also loved The Football Factory. That was a great movie.


It's kind of weird. Cockney is very much a white, working class accent. In London, the middle classes tend to speak Recieved Pronunciation, except with a lot of people this accent takes on stuff from cockney, especially dropping 't's at the end of a word.

Now young people have this new accent, Jafaican, or MLE. As an accent it's across between Jamaican, Cockney, RP, West African, and South Asian. If you're from a Caribbean background then the Jamaican part comes through more strongly. If you're middle class then the RP comes through more strongly. And so on. It's relatively new so it's only really spoken by under 25s.

The slang is all important as well, and the slang words come from a variety of different sources.

Da most truwist form ov da aksent is laayk dis ya kna, mans cha' wiv fick slang an' ting.

My personal aksunt iz like dis, I speek wiv less ov a thick aksunt coz I'm wi' an' middul claass.

maybe its difficult for you to see the difference.

So, let's make it clear. In your accent when you speak quick, what kind of D you use to represent words like brother, the, ecc...? A normal D (just like in the first video of CJ speakin on the phone) or a slightly different D (like in the second video)?
But first, confirm me that the two sounds are DIFFERENT, right? They are NOT the same D, ain't they ?
gingergenius
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 16 2008, 02:51 PM) [snapback]1394079[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 15 2008, 05:51 PM) [snapback]1393912[/snapback]
QUOTE(TwoFacedTanner @ Feb 15 2008, 04:19 PM) [snapback]1393904[/snapback]
I wish it'd stay like that.
I always loved the way they talk there.

And I also loved The Football Factory. That was a great movie.


It's kind of weird. Cockney is very much a white, working class accent. In London, the middle classes tend to speak Recieved Pronunciation, except with a lot of people this accent takes on stuff from cockney, especially dropping 't's at the end of a word.

Now young people have this new accent, Jafaican, or MLE. As an accent it's across between Jamaican, Cockney, RP, West African, and South Asian. If you're from a Caribbean background then the Jamaican part comes through more strongly. If you're middle class then the RP comes through more strongly. And so on. It's relatively new so it's only really spoken by under 25s.

The slang is all important as well, and the slang words come from a variety of different sources.

Da most truwist form ov da aksent is laayk dis ya kna, mans cha' wiv fick slang an' ting.

My personal aksunt iz like dis, I speek wiv less ov a thick aksunt coz I'm wi' an' middul claass.

maybe its difficult for you to see the difference.

So, let's make it clear. In your accent when you speak quick, what kind of D you use to represent words like brother, the, ecc...? A normal D (just like in the first video of CJ speakin on the phone) or a slightly different D (like in the second video)?
But first, confirm me that the two sounds are DIFFERENT, right? They are NOT the same D, ain't they ?


Brother is either broer or bruvver. In my accent.

The is either e or da.

sometimes I say it one time, others I say it another. Buy I'm not a gangsta.
CJ 4 life
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 16 2008, 06:21 PM) [snapback]1394097[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 16 2008, 02:51 PM) [snapback]1394079[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 15 2008, 05:51 PM) [snapback]1393912[/snapback]
QUOTE(TwoFacedTanner @ Feb 15 2008, 04:19 PM) [snapback]1393904[/snapback]
I wish it'd stay like that.
I always loved the way they talk there.

And I also loved The Football Factory. That was a great movie.


It's kind of weird. Cockney is very much a white, working class accent. In London, the middle classes tend to speak Recieved Pronunciation, except with a lot of people this accent takes on stuff from cockney, especially dropping 't's at the end of a word.

Now young people have this new accent, Jafaican, or MLE. As an accent it's across between Jamaican, Cockney, RP, West African, and South Asian. If you're from a Caribbean background then the Jamaican part comes through more strongly. If you're middle class then the RP comes through more strongly. And so on. It's relatively new so it's only really spoken by under 25s.

The slang is all important as well, and the slang words come from a variety of different sources.

Da most truwist form ov da aksent is laayk dis ya kna, mans cha' wiv fick slang an' ting.

My personal aksunt iz like dis, I speek wiv less ov a thick aksunt coz I'm wi' an' middul claass.

maybe its difficult for you to see the difference.

So, let's make it clear. In your accent when you speak quick, what kind of D you use to represent words like brother, the, ecc...? A normal D (just like in the first video of CJ speakin on the phone) or a slightly different D (like in the second video)?
But first, confirm me that the two sounds are DIFFERENT, right? They are NOT the same D, ain't they ?


Brother is either broer or bruvver. In my accent.

The is either e or da.

sometimes I say it one time, others I say it another. Buy I'm not a gangsta.

OK, this is how you pronounce it; but what about the last question I asked you? The two sounds of TH in the two videos are different, ain't they?
gingergenius
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 16 2008, 08:01 PM) [snapback]1394129[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 16 2008, 06:21 PM) [snapback]1394097[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 16 2008, 02:51 PM) [snapback]1394079[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 15 2008, 05:51 PM) [snapback]1393912[/snapback]
QUOTE(TwoFacedTanner @ Feb 15 2008, 04:19 PM) [snapback]1393904[/snapback]
I wish it'd stay like that.
I always loved the way they talk there.

And I also loved The Football Factory. That was a great movie.


It's kind of weird. Cockney is very much a white, working class accent. In London, the middle classes tend to speak Recieved Pronunciation, except with a lot of people this accent takes on stuff from cockney, especially dropping 't's at the end of a word.

Now young people have this new accent, Jafaican, or MLE. As an accent it's across between Jamaican, Cockney, RP, West African, and South Asian. If you're from a Caribbean background then the Jamaican part comes through more strongly. If you're middle class then the RP comes through more strongly. And so on. It's relatively new so it's only really spoken by under 25s.

The slang is all important as well, and the slang words come from a variety of different sources.

Da most truwist form ov da aksent is laayk dis ya kna, mans cha' wiv fick slang an' ting.

My personal aksunt iz like dis, I speek wiv less ov a thick aksunt coz I'm wi' an' middul claass.

maybe its difficult for you to see the difference.

So, let's make it clear. In your accent when you speak quick, what kind of D you use to represent words like brother, the, ecc...? A normal D (just like in the first video of CJ speakin on the phone) or a slightly different D (like in the second video)?
But first, confirm me that the two sounds are DIFFERENT, right? They are NOT the same D, ain't they ?


Brother is either broer or bruvver. In my accent.

The is either e or da.

sometimes I say it one time, others I say it another. Buy I'm not a gangsta.

OK, this is how you pronounce it; but what about the last question I asked you? The two sounds of TH in the two videos are different, ain't they?




aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

probably they are yes why does it matter?
CJ 4 life
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 17 2008, 01:42 AM) [snapback]1394181[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 16 2008, 08:01 PM) [snapback]1394129[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 16 2008, 06:21 PM) [snapback]1394097[/snapback]
QUOTE(CJ 4 life @ Feb 16 2008, 02:51 PM) [snapback]1394079[/snapback]
QUOTE(gingergenius @ Feb 15 2008, 05:51 PM) [snapback]1393912[/snapback]
QUOTE(TwoFacedTanner @ Feb 15 2008, 04:19 PM) [snapback]1393904[/snapback]
I wish it'd stay like that.
I always loved the way they talk there.

And I also loved The Football Factory. That was a great movie.


It's kind of weird. Cockney is very much a white, working class accent. In London, the middle classes tend to speak Recieved Pronunciation, except with a lot of people this accent takes on stuff from cockney, especially dropping 't's at the end of a word.

Now young people have this new accent, Jafaican, or MLE. As an accent it's across between Jamaican, Cockney, RP, West African, and South Asian. If you're from a Caribbean background then the Jamaican part comes through more strongly. If you're middle class then the RP comes through more strongly. And so on. It's relatively new so it's only really spoken by under 25s.

The slang is all important as well, and the slang words come from a variety of different sources.

Da most truwist form ov da aksent is laayk dis ya kna, mans cha' wiv fick slang an' ting.

My personal aksunt iz like dis, I speek wiv less ov a thick aksunt coz I'm wi' an' middul claass.

maybe its difficult for you to see the difference.

So, let's make it clear. In your accent when you speak quick, what kind of D you use to represent words like brother, the, ecc...? A normal D (just like in the first video of CJ speakin on the phone) or a slightly different D (like in the second video)?
But first, confirm me that the two sounds are DIFFERENT, right? They are NOT the same D, ain't they ?


Brother is either broer or bruvver. In my accent.

The is either e or da.

sometimes I say it one time, others I say it another. Buy I'm not a gangsta.

OK, this is how you pronounce it; but what about the last question I asked you? The two sounds of TH in the two videos are different, ain't they?




aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

probably they are yes why does it matter?

I'm sorry if I'm bothering you, but I absolutely need to know how the second sound is articulated (when CJ says "What THe..."). Where do I have to place my tongue? Please help me!!!!
NIGGALICIOUS
where da fuck is you goin wit dis nigga? lol

i dont know why you would say dis one minute and this the next... i really dont
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